Buy These Bordeaux 2016 Wines Now, Guarantee Provenance

May 09, 2017

I sat next to a Chinese wine collector at a dinner in Hong Kong last week and he showed me six emails from different wine merchants--from London, New York and Hong Kong--urging him to buy Bordeaux 2016 en primeur. He smiled and shook his head, "Why should I buy a wine in barrel that I have to wait 20 years to drink at a price that is more expensive than delicious mature vintages that I can enjoy now? Do they think I am stupid?"

He pointed to the price of Chateau Palmer, the 2016s released at 240 euros per bottle, a 14% increase in price from the 2015. It is currently selling for over $300 USD per bottle. For that price, one can buy the mature, delicious 1999 or the 2001.

A great year:

tasted the 2016s and was really impressed with the wines. These are classically-styled reds that have firm structure, suave tannins with freshness and wonderful definition. The wines are terrific, consistent across the board, both on the Merlot-dominant right bank as well as the Cabernet Sauvignon-dominant left bank--at all price points.

Continue reading: Forbes

photo: NICOLAS





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