Graham Lyons Cellar Sale Complete

September 17, 2015

The final part of Graham Lyons’ fine wine collection was 100% sold by Zachys in Hong Kong last week and realized over HK$31 million.

Offered on 11 September the third and final part of Lyons’ collection made over twice its pre-sale estimate with buyers “leaping” at the chance to buy top fine wines from around the world.

Particular highlights included: a Jeroboam of 1961 Haut-Brion which made HK$343,000, three magnums of 1971 Domaine de la Romanée-Conti Romanée-Conti which realised HK$1.2m, a magnum of 1874 Lafite which went for HK$196,000, six bottles of 1929 Yquem going for HK$232,750 and a bottle of 1792 Blandy’s Madeira realizing HK$58,800.

Jeff Zacharia, president of Zachys, commented, “The third installment of the Graham Lyons Cellar exceeded all expectations, and our expectations were high. From Bordeaux and Burgundy, to wine regions less seen at auction, bidders internationally realized that this auction was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, and the prices realized reflect that.”

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